Poetry London Prize 2021: Judge’s Report

by Malika Booker As a judge, I always ask myself the following questions when selecting the winners: What haunts you? What stands out? What poem made you forget you were …

Poetry London Prize 2020: Highly Commended

Luke Allan Mantelpiece with Bananas Sometimes a great boredom comes over me when I am naked. Standing at the window watching a man fasten his daughter into the plastic bike-seat, …

Poetry London Prize 2020: 3rd PRIZE

S. Niroshini Letters to Sunny Leone i. Dear Sunny, I want to explain to you how I lost track of my body. Or rather, how I lost the sense that …

Poetry London Prize 2020: 1st PRIZE

Eleanor Penny Winter, a biography I’ll admit I was raised in a red house by a woman with red hands on a bare hill, where birds walked on the ground …

Poetry London Clore Prize 2019: Highly Commended

Catherine Higgins-Moore I’d been waiting months For a house in the new estate. They weren’t allowed murals. They’d built-in kitchens. Tarmaced driveways. An address that didn’t mark your card. I …

Poetry London Clore Prize 2019: Highly Commended

Nicholas Murray WODGE I’d like to think it was our tongues,recalcitrant, not coldly mocking,that made the new boy into “Wodge”.The best that we could do. So Wodziński, the doctor’s son,shared …

Poetry London Clore Prize 2019: 3rd PRIZE

Anita Pati Manju Because he liked the toddy,because he twinkled for her,he beat her.Because he towered andshe was a bird, because he was sousedand the kerosene caskto cook sabzi exploded it …

Poetry London Clore Prize 2019: 1st PRIZE

Roger Bloor The Ghost of Molly Leigh Pleads, Yes Cries for Exemplarie Justice Against the Arbitrarie, Un-exampled Injustice of Her Accusers Question the First: By which Devils are the Operations …

An Interview with Roger Bloor, winner of the Poetry London Clore Prize 2019

Well, this will be fun, I think! I’d like to start off by congratulating you again on your triumph – well done! I know the judge, Sasha Dugdale, was impressed by the winners, and it’s exciting that we’ll be publishing your winning poem in Poetry London. I’d like to know more about Molly Leigh, the subject of your poem, who was accused of witchcraft in the seventeenth century. What is it about her story that captured your attention?